VIDEO: Trouble in paradise! The Race To Save Salt Whistle Bay

By Demion McTair. Updated 5:18 p.m., Saturday, May 23, 2020, Atlantic Standard Time (GMT-4).

Mayreau, The Grenadines (ONE NEWS SVG) – A favorite for tourists and locals alike, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, in the Southern Grenadines is known for its beauty.

But, if sufficient action is not taken soon to address coastal erosion, the beach area could lose its glory quickly.

At the Salt Whistle Bay area, there are two beaches separated by a stretch of land.

The stretch of land decked with coconut trees acts as a border to ensure the beach on the peaceful Caribbean Sea side escapes being over run by the waters of the restless Atlantic ocean, at the beach on the other side.

But, after years of persistent erosion, the waters which meet the beach on the Atlantic side are now overrunning the narrow land border and encroaching on calm beach on the Caribbean sea side.

Sources who canvas the area say that the land erosion on the Atlantic beach side is so grave, that at some parts of the area, as little as six feet of land now remain to prevent the two beaches from merging and splitting part of Mayreau in two.

Government authorities started a race against the tides and conducted remedial work on the area in September 2019. They also explored ways of solving the erosion issue.

But the coastal erosion is violent and relentless, tumbling down once majestic coconut trees.

If the race to salvage the area is not won, one of the country’s main docking areas for yachts, and a favourite for beach goers could be lost.

See this video from Sonia Duchesne with the situation:

Salt Whistle Bay erosion

Written by onenewsstvincent

One News St. Vincent is a subsidiary of ONE NEWS MEDIA which also includes Campus Reporter News (UWI Mona) and Secrets of St. Vincent and the Grenadines Travel and Tourism site. One News St. Vincent was founded on March 25, 2020. It is designed to bring a fresh social media engagement approach to news presentation in St. Vincent and the Grenadines and the rest of the eastern Caribbean.

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